National Buddy Day 1 June 2012

http://www.buddyday.org.au/share-to-stop-bullying

Her Royal Highness Crown Princess Mary of Denmark

“As a mother, I am naturally concerned and interested in the issue of preventing bullying. Parents and educators alike are responsible for teaching our children to build communities – and to ensure the lives of children are free from bullying.  In my role as International Patron of The Alannah and Madeline Foundation, I would like to extend my support to National Buddy Day, a wonderful initiative designed to celebrate friendships and highlight the issue of bullying.”

Jack Riewoldt, AFL Footballer and Buddy Day Supporter

“Join me in supporting National Buddy Day on 1st June to raise awareness of the issue of bullying and to help put an end to this important issue”

Dr. Judith Slocombe 
CEO, The Alannah and Madeline Foundation

“Now in its third year, National Buddy Day is a joint initiative of NAB and The Alannah and Madeline Foundation. National Buddy Day is designed to highlight the issue of bullying, and celebrate friendships across Australia. With 27 per cent of young people reporting they are bullied every two weeks or more often, this initiative is a very important one.”

Giaan Rooney OAM
Olympic Gold Medallist

Bullying is a serious matter. Research shows that it can severely impact a child’s wellbeing. Please join me in celebrating National Buddy Day on 1st June to raise awareness for the Better Buddies program, designed to create positive, caring and friendly school environments, and reduce bullying in primary schools”.

Dr. Michael Carr-Gregg
Adolescent Psychologist and NCAB Member

Please join with me in being an enthusiastic supporter of National Buddy Day. Together all Australians can  celebrate children in primary schools respecting others and appreciating differences. It is only by working together that we can reduce the harm from bullying.”

Sandra Craig
National Centre Against Bullying

“The National Centre Against Bullying is concerned with the wellbeing of young people wherever they live, learn or play. We at the Centre know the power of strong supportive relationships to reduce bullying. The Centre supports National Buddy Day in its celebration of friendship and discussion around the issue of bullying.”

Garry Lyon

“On National Buddy Day I will be supporting the Alannah and Madeline Foundation and NAB as they bring Aussie kids together to combat bullying”

  • ABOUT NATIONAL BUDDY DAYResearch shows that one of the ways to address bullying in later years is to empower kids to care for other kids in primary school – by doing so, children learn from other kids the value of respecting others, and appreciating difference.

    In 2010, NAB and The Alannah and Madeline Foundation commissioned Newspoll research to manage the issue of bullying in Australia. Conducted in February 2010, the Newspoll omnibus found that:

    • 92% of Australian’s believe that bullying is a serious issue in our communities;
    • 74% of people said that they were bullied in some way during their schooling years;
    • Almost one in four respondents have at some stage been bullied in the workplace;
    • 20% of those surveyed aged between 18 and 24 had been bullied electronically (including email, SMS, Facebook, MySpace or YouTube.)

    Dr. Judith Slocombe, CEO of The Alannah and Madeline Foundation, believes the results of this research are significant. “Bullying is clearly a major issue in society today. National Buddy Week provides the opportunity for all Australians to discuss the subject while also concentrating on the positive relationships in their lives,” she said.

    NAB and The Alannah and Madeline Foundation developed National Buddy Day to raise awareness about the importance of friendship and the issue of bullying amongst primary school aged children.

    NAB 3 - NAB

    While bullying is a societal problem not confined to schools, NAB believes schools and children’s social    environment are a good place to start. We feel passionately about protecting children and providing the opportunity for children to enjoy a safe and happy childhood.

    As a major Australian Bank, we understand that we have a responsibility to face into the issues that impact the health and safety of our communities. By managing the issue, rather than pretending it doesn’t exist, we look to turn the table on these negative behaviours which we know have lasting impacts on the lives of many Australians.

      

    THE ALANNAH AND MADELINE FOUNDATION

    The Alannah and Madeline Foundation is a national charity protecting children from violence. The Foundation was set up in memory of Alannah and Madeline Mikac, aged 6 and 3, who along with their mother and 32 others, were tragically killed at Port Arthur on 28 April 1996.
    2 - AMF
    Our vision is that every child will live in a safe and supportive environment. We care for children who have experienced or witnessed violence and run programs that prevent violence in the lives of children

    One of the most common forms of violence children in Australia experience is bullying, which is why The Alannah and Madeline Foundation set up the National Centre Against Bullying (NCAB), the Better Buddies Framework and eSmart.

    Together with NAB we are delighted to continue to build on the success on National Buddy Week 2011 by developing National Buddy Day and providing an opportunity to celebrate friendships and discuss the important issue of bullying.

    Since 2007 NAB has worked with The Alannah and Madeline Foundation to address the issue of bullying through the Better Buddies Framework. Since the partnership commenced, the number of participating schools has grown from 30 to almost 1,000.

2 Responses to National Buddy Day 1 June 2012

  1. Celianet says:

    great website. thank you for the info. cheers!

  2. Bernadete says:

    this blog is so good i would come here every day.

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